Heritage Trails & Talks

Art, Culture & Heritage On a Budget

The Moreton Bay Region is ready to let you walk the paths of antiquity and learn about Brisbane’s heritage in talks of yesteryear and traversing bygone trails.

Deception Bay Heritage Trail

The Deception Bay Heritage Trail covers about four kilometres and can be completed in a 90-minute stroll. Over 10 unique sculptural markers, made from brushed and painted aluminium on structural aluminium pipe, identify each heritage location. Starting at the intersection of Beach Road and Joseph Crescent, the Deception Bay Heritage Trail follows Captain Cook Parade through historical sites such as the Bathing Pool and Bancroft Baths.

Several BBQ and picnic facilities are dotted along the route, as well as a few viewing platforms, parks, playgrounds, dog parks and even a simple mountain bike course with a couple of little jumps great for young ones.

Cottonwood Walk

The 1.5km Cottonwood Walk is part of the 4km Deception Bay Heritage Trail which takes you all along the esplanade and through parklands.

During low tide, keen-eyed visitors to the trail might be able to spot the Bancroft Baths, carved into the sandstone and hidden in the mudflats. In the 19th century, it was a widely held belief that the fresh sea air and water were a way of healing the illnesses caused by the increasingly industrialised world, and it’s an idea that still seems to ring true today. Deception Bay holds the only known baths of this kind in the state.

Post-Settlement Redcliffe

Lace-up your walking shoes to see the sites of such former delights as Comino’s Arcade, Luna Park and the Rollerdrome as you stroll by the beach past parklands, a swimming lagoon, shops and dining establishments. The post-settlement Redcliffe walk can also be paired with the Redcliffe Convict Trail for a longer journey around the foreshore and inland to Humpybong Creek.

Each stop has a corresponding audio track available on the official Moreton Bay Regional Council website that recounts personal and nostalgic stories provided by members of the Redcliffe Historical Society who lived on the peninsula during its early years.

As you stroll, look out for the white markers which indicate each stop on this Redcliffe walk.

Redcliffe Convict Trail

Although now a thriving seaside town, Redcliffe plays a very important role in the history of Moreton Bay Region’s colonial past. Starting from the Redcliffe Jetty (the landing site of the Amity brig vessel transporting the settlers), the Redcliffe Convict Trail will take you on a walk through Australia’s first penal colony established in 1824 by a group of soldiers, convicts and government officials. Other stops along the way include the First Settlement Wall, the former site of the Commissariat Store, Humpybong Creek where the colony received their freshwater supply, and the Brick Kiln and Weir site.

After visiting the Brick Kiln and Weir sight, you can veer off the Convict Trail to Redcliffe Museum where you can admire remnants from Moreton Bay regions past among other preserved historical items. Back on the trail, stop 6 is the old site of the Soldier Barracks where John Street exists now. Moving on you will see the Commandant’s Cottage, Whipping Post and the Convict Barracks.

Each stop along the trail is complemented by a Redcliffe Convict Trail audio track accessible online, describing the site’s significance and contributing other illuminating details.

From discovering the history of Queensland by walking the historic paths in the Moreton Bay Region, there’s plenty to uncover about our legacy.

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Looking for more things to do and see? Pop into one of the region's Accredited Visitor Information Centres. The volunteers have a wealth of local knowledge.



Author
Rochelle Lyons

With a background in content writing, social media management and marketing, Rochelle is an avid lover of all things food, book and dog-related, and thinks she's much better at sports than she really is. At only 5'3", she's usually always the shortest among a group of people but will make a point to tell you she's the tallest of all her family members.

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